Thursday, 31 December 2015

2015 in Fiction

Another year, another list. Here are the fictional works, quotes, and scenes that have affected me the most this year.

Quote of the Year:

"I guarantee you that at some point, everything's going to go south on you, and you're going to say, 'This is it, this is how I end.' Now you can either accept that, or you can get to work." - Mark Watney, The Martian

Scene of the Year:

This isn't actually from this year, but Elevens regeneration into Twelve is my scene of the year, because "we all change, when you think about it... ...and that's okay... long as you remember all the people that you used to be." I am not who I was, and for a moment this year I did not recognise my own memories, being disconnected from my own past. But that's who I was - all those people are people that I used to be.

Film of the Year:

2015 is probably the year I've been to the cinema the most, so far in my life, and I have seen films on both extremes of the Romanticism versus Enlightenment scale, from the two capping films of the year I saw at the beginning and the end (The Hobbit and Star Wars: The Force Awakens) for Team Romanticism, to Tomorrowland (highly underrated) and The Martian for Team Enlightenment. I have to give this one to Team Enlightenment, and within that to The Martian, for the same sentiment expressed in the quote at the top. We're human, dammit. We don't roll over and let our circumstances crush us, no matter how hopeless they feel - in fact, we actively seek out challenges, as we have that spirit that Reagan mentioned in his speech after the Challenger disaster: "Give me a challenge and I'll meet it with joy.". So for that reason, The Martian is my film of the year.

Speech of the Year:

This one is a competition between Governor Nix's directed-at-the-audience "Reason you suck speech", and the 12th Doctor's anti-war speech from The Zygon Inversion. I'm giving this one to Tomorrowland (another point for Team Enlightenment) because of this - "In every moment there is the possibility for a better future, but you people won't believe it - and because you won't believe it, you won't do what is necessary to make it a reality". I look around me, and I can see how everything could be made better, how we already have the tools we need. We're not condemned to failure, it's something we choose everyday.

Thursday, 25 December 2014

Christmas - God Chose

The part of the Nativity that has really struck me this year is God's omniscience - that God, being omniscient, cannot be surprised. Anything that happens to Him, happens because He has decided that that is what will happen. As Jesus said about His life, "No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord."

So when we come to the Nativity, we come to a story in which everything that happened was chosen by God. Jesus was the only person ever to be born who was able to choose the circumstances of their birth - the family they would be born into, their social class, their country... and in Jesus, we see someone who chose the opposite of what most, if not all, people would choose.

Jesus was not born into a wealthy family, part of the elite of society.  He wasn't born in an important city. His birth was not anywhere of note. Instead, Jesus chose to be born to a poor couple, in a little town of little significance in the worlds eyes, a town that couldn't even supply Him with a room to be born in, to a people and country oppressed by a brutal foreign occupation. The person who could have had Kings attending His birth, instead chose shepherds, the people near the bottom of the social pyramid. He could have had the company of the rulers of men at His birth; instead, He was born among animals.

The story of Christmas, is the story of God choosing to identify with the poor, the oppressed, and the lowly. He chose to say of those who the world looks down on, "These are my people, and this is my family."

Saturday, 19 July 2014

This Misfit Is You

[Thank you to Anna Magdalena, whose thoughts on the subject triggered the thinking that led to this post.]  

I recently watched Frozen, and, whilst checking Behind The Voice Actors to see if I recognised any of the names (none, except for Alan Tudyk, a.k.a Wash), I noticed a poll of the viewers favourite characters from the movie. The poll was, unsurprisingly, topped by Elsa, and I believe I know why.

Elsa, like most people, is a misfit.

Now, I don't mean she is a misfit in the sense that she is an outcast from society, the sort of person who hangs around on the edges because they have no place. I mean she is a misfit in the sense of a square peg in a round hole - it will go in if you hammer it enough, but to do so requires suppressing the essential squareness of the peg. Like the X-men, Elsa has a part of herself that is integral to who she is, but which she has to hide away from everyone, even her own family. When finally she is forced to reveal this part of herself, she has to flee from everyone and everything she's known. But it is there in the wilderness that she comes to embrace that part of herself, something TV Tropes calls an I am what I am realisation. Far way from anyone who she can hurt, she is free to be herself.

I am reminded, here, of a TEDx talk I watched a while ago, about how we all have something we're hiding. I believe the reason characters like Elsa, like the X-men, resonate so much with people because we are all, on some level, misfits. We all have some aspect of ourselves that we hide, either because we are ashamed, or afraid of how people will react, or worried about damaging the relationships we have. Often, in fact I would say most of the time, these aspects of ourselves are not bad things - the term guilty pleasure is used a lot to refer to enjoying things that it is not socially acceptable for the category of people you are in to enjoy, but rarely do we ask why we should feel guilt at, for example, watching and enjoying a cartoon aimed at children. But if you do try to express yourself, you're quite likely to find someone out there who is trying to, as it were, shove you back into the closet.

Going back to Frozen, there is part where Elsa is telling Anna how it is best that she is alone, where she can be who she is without hurting anybody. Yet at the end, it's Anna's love that allows her to express who she is openly - and in doing so, find the freedom she needs to once again have a proper relationship with her sister, without hurting anyone. Until we can be free to be ourselves and to embrace who we are - and embrace each other, with all that makes us us - we're not going to be healthy, and neither will our relationships.

But once we learn to Let It Go...

Friday, 10 May 2013

Agorism, Anarcho-Capitalism, and Detroit Threat Management

In my recent blue sky searching about Agorism, I came across a group in Detroit that is tackling the crime that plagues their city, going by the name Detroit Threat Management.

Of course, they don't describe themselves as Agorists, or, I'd imagine, Anarcho-Capitalists. But in a sense, they are a prototype Private Defence Agency, albeit one which focuses on stopping crimes in progress and operates under a higher court (incidentally, this is the closest we've come to proper Anarcho-Capitalism in history; from what I've heard about the Icelandic Commonwealth, the private police were responsibly only for enforcing the law, with a common court system above them). Interestingly enough, they don't limit themselves to the wealthy areas either, providing security for free to those who can't afford to pay for their services. In what might be the first example of Anarcho-Capitalism in action in modern America, we see a possible answer to the question of how the poor would get security (although the thinking rich might choose to provide it out of their own pocket anyway, since it would have the effect of reducing their own defence premiums by cutting off crime where it starts).

Getting back to the subject of Agorism, and counter-economic private law enforcement, the continued existence of the state places restrictions on how this can be done. However, there is nothing - at least, no law that I know of - that prevents individuals from stopping crimes in process (provided they use "reasonable force"). Indeed, volunteer groups like the Guardian Angels famously provide additional, non-state security in cities such as New York. Also, in the UK special constables are enabled to make arrests whether they are on or off duty, which raises the possibility that a group of special constables could form something of an enhanced neighbourhood watch patrolling their area (or, of course, just have one or two for making the actual arrests...).

My thoughts on Agorism and Real-life Superheroes are for another post...

Sunday, 6 January 2013

The Ghost of Christmas Past, Or, The Shotgun Gospel - Christmas Story 2012-2013

The world of the future. Not that one would know it is the future, for to be the future, it must be relative to history, events which occurred in the past, and with the world council in complete control of all history – history which, naturally, paints them as the force for order, triumphing over the forces of chaos – terms like past and future are meaningless.

This is a world without war. It is a world without the Darwinian struggle that marked life before a few hundred years prior to the revolution – within the supposed timeline of the world council's existence, though the zero date on their calender was, eventually, set to an arbitrary time before the present. Though as everyone who has been to school knows, the world council came into existence before the zero point of the calender, having existed for an unknown time before that, though only revealing their existence when the forces of chaos – not, one may note, the forces of evil, for they have moved beyond such primitive concepts as good and evil – forced their hand, and after a terrible war, they rebuilt the world far better than before.

It is also a world without progress, for what use is progress when you have reached the pinnacle? Many individuals would, if they had the words, disagree with this, having an unsettling feeling that all is not right with the world. But they do not have the words – even if they were able to articulate the desire to not be observed, they would be unable to explain why they consider it to be a positive desire.

The world council know this, and they also know that it is quite a common feeling, one that the numerous psychiatrists that they provide have been unable to get rid of entirely. Though euthanasia is provided freely to those who find it overpowering, a tactic which cynics – were such beings to still exist – would label as a ploy to encourage people who could be a danger to the world council to voluntarily remove themselves from existence.

It is a world which an author, long forgotten, would say is somewhere where it is always winter but never Christmas. But the inhabitants of this future would, if they heard such a thing, merely look blankly – they know about winter, but the word Christmas would be alien to them. By this point, only a few individuals in the world council would recognise the word. Nearly everyone, however, would be familiar with it's descendent, with which it bears a passing resemblance – Winterval, a festival that takes place in the middle of winter, where gifts are given by the world council to the population.

No. Not everyone would find this word alien. However, those few that do are not going to let on that they know; at least, not at the present time. They themselves only know due to others – parents, mainly, transmitting it vertically down the family line, although in some cases a bond of trust has been great enough between two individuals enough that one who knows has risked sharing the message with the other, a message of hope, and a dream that this world order – this winter - is not going to last forever. It is a message that has been passed through snatched conversations and whispers, spoken hurriedly at moments when they are not being observed – a rarity in this age, where even the trees are wired with cameras.

No, this too is incorrect. They are not the only ones who understand the true meaning of Christmas. There are others, hidden away where the world council cannot find them – under the sea, gripping the seabed near hydrothermal vents. Buried in the ice of Antarctica, tapping the great geothermal supplies there for their energy. Living in networks of tunnels beneath the feet of the world council territories, deep enough that their presence is unnoticed. Some, even, have taken to space in their quest for freedom. For many years they have lived like this, avoiding the attention of those who would destroy them.

This Christmas, however, they are not content to hide away. This is the year in which they will take action. This year, their plan – a plan that has been unfolding over the past several years – will finally culminate. From the small group in space working to take over the satellites of the world council, to those deep underground taking control over the cables which service the web, this Christmas will be televised.

Now, now it is time for the message to be broadcast. Where the population is expecting to see a repeat of the same mind-numbing film which was broadcast last year, they instead see...

“Merry Christmas, Chiron Beta Prime. You might not want to eat the Soylent Green pie. But we will come and visit you soon, we promise. You have not been abandoned. You are not alone.

Anyway, most of you will not know what Christmas is. I take it you guys are familiar with the concept of God, although from what I gather your understanding extends only as far as a supreme being, the maker of all, who delegates all earthly authority to his two representatives, the church and the state. That is... not quite how it actually works. But I digress – there will hopefully be time to explain later.

So, Christmas. Basically, it's summed up in a verse of the Bible which I'm not sure you still have. It's John 3:16 if it's still in there – for God so loved the world that he gave his one and only son, that whoever believes in him shall not die but have eternal life. That, in a roasted chestnut shell, is what Christmas is about; it's important that you don't get hung up on the gendered language, because then you'll miss the actual meaning. The important thing is that God and God's son are sort of the same person, but aren't. They're two individuals, who are both God, but bound so tightly up that they're sort of one being. It's really hard to grasp, so don't worry if you can't get your mind around it – there's probably only three beings in existence who can understand it; the two I've mentioned already, and the Holy Spirit, who is another member of what we call the Godhead. Together, they make up the Trinity.

Yeah, it's really hard to understand, but simple at the same time. Basically, we messed up badly, which should be evident to anyone who has been hurt – that is, everyone in this world. It turns out we're not able to take the place of God; you'd have thought that would be obvious, but it seems it wasn't to our parents. We screwed up so badly, we needed God to help us put things right. So God decided to come down here. Of course, our delightful overlords couldn't tolerate that, so they nailed him to a couple of planks of wood. Yep, you heard that right – they nailed the creator and master of the universe to some wood. Obviously, that wouldn't work in the long run, because God is master over everything, death included. So he comes back, having gone down to hell – that's sort of a land of eternal death, but not unconsciousness, where God has withdrawn his presence, so I guess think of the Earth but without the Sun - and taking all our messed up baggage with him, and frightens a few people, as you might expect. The point is, he does this to prove that he rules over death. Yeah, he goes to the cross willingly, so that by his sacrifice humans could be free from all that. That's where the second part of that verse I mentioned comes in – whoever believes in him shall not die but have eternal life. God is the source of all life, so it should be obvious that you'd need to be where God is to have life. But you can either be with God after you die, or without God; it's a choice between life and death. Thus the whole point of Jesus – that's the God's son that I mentioned – is that we can choose God and have life. You can do it right now, if you want – being God, you don't need to wait to see him face to face, since he can read your thoughts. Unlike the world council. Which is good, because they don't take kindly to people doing that.

Point is, guys, what another bible verse says – don't fear him who can destroy the body, but fear him who can destroy the soul. These guys who call themselves the world council, they're nothing. Soon they'll crumble to dust and be no more. That's just the way the universe goes. Jesus offers life – what can they do to match that?”

At this point, the world council succeeds in blocking the transmissions. But it is too late, the damage has already been done. Christmas has finally, after a long winter, arrived for the oppressed people of the Earth.

Friday, 16 November 2012

A Call to the Autistic Community

This is, first and foremost, an appeal for unity, for united we stand, divided we fall. If we're ever going to win the fight which we were born into, if we're ever going to forge a better world for everyone - everyone, from the most severely Autistic to the NT's - we need to put aside our differences. Some of us wish for our own separate communities. That is okay, as long as we always remember that everyone is equal in intrinsic worth, and no-one is intrinsically superior to other people just because they are better suited to the environment they are in.

So this is my call. I call upon everyone to unite. There's been a lot of talk these past few years, a lot of arguments, pitching both ends of the spectrum against each other, the Autists against the NT's, and yes, different Autism groups against each other. This needs to be done away with. I know, the Autist community is young, and will mature as time passes. But the problems we are facing leave no time for juvenile bickering. It's a tragedy when people are sent to institutes rather than the problem that is posed to society by their existence - and I use problem in the sense of a puzzle to be solved, not as a comment on their worth - being dealt with. But polarising the matter does not help them, and accusations will not quicken their release. Working to build a better alternative will. So we must stand together, or we will be dealt with individually. No-one poses a threat to a rotten system when they are pounding their fists futilely against the walls, but united together with others, they can build a battering ram.

However, we cannot pretend everyone is the same. Does an ear feel inferior because it is not a hand? We all have things we can contribute - we must not be afraid to admit that we are not all as able to do the same thing. It is vital that we always remember that we are all equal in value. But it is equally important that we remember that we are not all equal in ability; pretending otherwise is the path of foolishness. Once we grasp this, we can utilise our strengths and cover our weaknesses. Though I am not a Marxist, or by an stretch of the imagination all that left wing, those who are the most capable must shoulder the most burden. Only those who can speak can be spokesmen, but in such a position, they bear the awesome responsibility of speaking, not just for themselves, but for those who cannot speak or who will not be listened to. In this we must always remember that extrinsic superiority is no reason to boast, when for want of complications during birth one may have been severely brain damaged and reliant upon others for ones entire life. So do not be so quick to boast of alleged superiority.

It was Benjamin Franklin who said, "We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately." These words are as true today as they were back then. We have a choice facing us. If we choose wrongly, we may as well fade back into the woodwork, back into stealth, back into trying to make it in a world that does not understand us. I am not willing to choose that option.

Friday, 19 October 2012

Gary McKinnon and the purpose of extradition

This seems like a topical subject to write a post about.

First off, whilst I am glad that he's not being extradited, I disagree with the grounds for blocking his extradition.Obviously, handing him over the American's for them to lock him up until he dies, never seeing his home country again, would have been excessive. However, there are far better reasons for him to not be extradited than worries about his mental health.

Such as the fact that America has no legal claim on him. The purpose of extradition is to prevent people from breaking the law in a country, then fleeing said country to avoid justice. In McKinnon's case, he had not done this - the offence was committed on British soil, breaking British law (the Computer Misuse Act), and as such, the appropriate forum is a UK court. If McKinnon had been guilty of hacking into the computer of an American individual, as no-doubt happens daily, I highly doubt that extradition would have been on the cards.

Then there is also UK law to consider. Such as the English Bill of Rights (1689), which provides "That all grants and promises of fines and forfeitures of particular persons before conviction are illegal and void." Whether or not this can be taken to prohibit extradition without a conviction in the UK depends on whether one considers extradition a forfeiture; however, there is also the Magna Carta to consider: 
"No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgement of his equals or by the law of the land." Unfortunately, the Extradition Act in question is now part of the law of the land, so I would hesitate in using this as a legal defence (although it does show that the Act could be considered unconstitutional).

However, I believe it can be shown that extraditing McKinnon would have been an illegitimate action by the UK government.